Summary of Symposia

Symposium 1:
New Directions in Analytical Electrochemistry (details)

Symposium 2:
Electrochemical Aspects of Biological Systems: Theory, Experiment and Applications (details)

Symposium 3:
Batteries for Tomorrow’s World (details)

Symposium 4:
Advances in Fuel Cells from Materials to Systems (details)

Symposium 5:
Novel Insights to Electrochemical Capacitors (details)

Symposium 6:
New Progress in Electrochemical Solar Cells (details)

Symposium 7:
Electrodeposition - The Frontier Approach in Material Science and Nanofabrication (details)

Symposium 8:
Corrosion and Passivity (details)

Symposium 9:
Electrocatalytic Materials (details)

Symposium 10:
Electrochemical Technology: New Challenges for a More Competitive Economy (details)

Symposium 11:
New Important Frontiers in Molecular Electrochemistry (details)

Symposium 12:
Physical Electrochemistry: Spectroscopic, Structural, and Theoretical Investigations of the Electrified Interface (details)

Symposium 13:
Molecular Systems for Energy Conversion (details)

Symposium 14:
Modeling, Design and Characterization of Nanostructured, Electroactive and Multifunctional Materials (details)

Symposium 15:
Electrochemical Engineering from a Quantum Description to the Plant Modeling:
Experiments and Design across Length Scales
(details)

Symposium 16:
Supramolecular Electrochemistry for Analysis, Medicine and Biological Sciences (details)

Symposium 17:
Novel in Situ in Operando Methods (details)

Symposium 18:
General Session (details)



Symposium 1:

New Directions in Analytical Electrochemistry
Sponsored by: Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry

Faster, cheaper and better... Tomorrow in Electroanalytical Chemistry
New research in analytical electrochemistry is driven by our quest to better understand and more effectively measure the world around us. We see developments aimed at lower detection limits, faster analyses, lower cost and more portable systems. Electrodes with improved selectivities and greater stability over extended use are other goals. Completely new electroanalytical strategies may be needed for quantification of emerging analytes of biological or environmental importance. Innovative ways of using electrochemistry to unravel the details of complex processes is another important area; this can involve pushing the physical limits and chemical frontiers of electrodes to make measurements in unusual locations. This symposium will highlight recent advances in all these areas.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• New electroanalytical techniques, including hyphenated
techniques, to address shortcomings in established
methods
• Novel electrode materials which offer advantages and new opportunities for analysis
• Advanced data analysis methodologies for analysis of complex systems
• New strategies for monitoring and quantifying emergent analytes (both biomarkers and contaminants) of biological or environmental importance
• Techniques and methodologies for examining the details of complex processes at the nano and microscale

Symposium Organizers
Lin-Chi Chen (Coordinator)
, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (chenlinchi@ntu.edu.tw)
Meng-Jiy Wang, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan
Alison Downard, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
Daniel Mandler, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel



Symposium 2:

Electrochemical Aspects of Biological Systems: Theory, Experiment and Applications
Sponsored by: Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry

This symposium organized by Division 2 of the ISE is aimed to be a broad-based bioelectrochemistry symposium. It will discuss all aspects of bioelectrochemistry, from fundamentals through to new technological applications. Solicited papers should encompass electrochemistry of single biomolecules, molecular assemblies, membranes, cells and tissues, and their interfaces with electrodes, together with applications in biosensors, bio-energy systems and bioelectronic devices. This symposium invites papers on theoretical and/or experimental approaches that may lead to improved understanding of the behavior of biological systems.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Theoretical approaches that lead to an improved understanding of the electrochemical behavior of biological systems
• Experimental strategies that lead to improved understanding of the electrochemical behavior of biological systems
• Novel applications of electrochemistry in biosensors and bioanalytical devices
• Novel applications of electrochemistry in bio-energy systems
• Novel applications of electrochemistry in bioelectronics

Symposium Organizers
Damien Arrigan (Coordinator), Curtin University, Perth, Australia (d.arrigan@curtin.edu.au)
Shen-Ming Chen, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan
Elena Ferapontova, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
Mei-Jywan Syu
, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan



Symposium 3:

Batteries for Tomorrow’s World
Sponsored by: Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

The performance of current electrical energy storage systems falls well short of requirements for using electrical energy efficiently in transportation, smart grid, commercial, and residential applications. Fundamental knowledge is critically needed to uncover the underlying principles that control the basic processes that determine and govern their function, operation, performance limitations and failure. With this underpinning knowledge, wholly new concepts in cell design and operation can be developed for a new class of electrical energy storage systems. A new paradigm is required to design new stable anodes, cathodes and electrolytes to provide electrochemical cells with high energy density, high power, long lifetime and adequate safety at a competitive manufacturing cost. The goal of this Symposium is to review recent R&D efforts in this field to elucidate fundamental chemical, transport, electrical, and physical processes that can help improve the existing stateof- the-art Li-ion batteries and stimulate development of next generation rechargeable batteries e.g., Li-S, Me-air batteries, Na-ion, redox flow and multi-valent systems etc.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Advanced materials, electrodes and electrolytes for rechargeable batteries
• Novel rechargeable battery systems
• Interfacial phenomena
• Cell testing, performance evaluation, failure mechanisms
• New computational and characterization tools
• Safety

Symposium Organizers
Robert Kostecki (Coordinator), Lawrence Berkeley National
Laboratory, Berkeley, USA (r_kostecki@lbl.gov)
She-Huang Wu (Co-coordinator), Tatung University, Taipei, Taiwan (shwu@ttu.edu.tw)
Kuniaki Tatsumi, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Osaka, Japan
Fu-Ming Wang, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan



Symposium 4:

Advances in Fuel Cells from Materials to Systems
Sponsored by: Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

The focus of this symposium is on all types of low and high temperature fuel cells, as well as electrochemical generation of hydrogen. Particular emphasis will be given to the in situ and operando characterization of fuel cells and electrolyzers, and to recent materials developments for durable fuel cell components, as well as the optimized integration of fuel cells into energy supply systems.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Synthesis and design of fuel cell materials (catalysts, electrolytes, gas diffusion layer, bipolar plates, etc) and materials for low and high temperature electrolyzers
• New experimental approaches for characterization of fuel cell and electrolyzer materials
• Electrocatalysis for oxygen reduction, and oxidation of hydrogen and organic fuels
• Novel electrolyte materials synthesis, structural and electrochemical characterization
• Improved understanding of electrochemical reaction processes in fuel cells
• New insights into the degradation and aging modes of component materials and failure mechanisms of fuel cells and electrolyzers
• Fuel cell operando diagnostics, in situ characterization

Symposium Organizers
Hiroyuki Uchida (Coordinator), University of Yamanashi, Kofu, Japan (h-uchida@yamanashi.ac.jp)
Lorenz Gubler (Co-coordinator)
, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland (lorenz.gubler@psi.ch)
Kuan-Zong Fung, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan
Kuei-Hsien Chen, Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan
Yu-Lin Kuo, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan



Symposium 5:

Novel Insights to Electrochemical Capacitors
Sponsored by: Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

This symposium addresses all fundamental and practical aspects on electrochemical capacitor research, development and applications. Topics include capacitor performance for power uses such as electric vehicles and energy storage application as well as advanced materials for capacitors (e.g., carbonaceous materials and their composites, polymers, inorganic materials etc.). Novel insights into capacitors, such as in situ study of electrode/electrolyte interfaces, new designs/concepts for fabricating high performance devices, and synthesis of advanced electrolytes are welcome.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance of porous materials
• Materials with primarily faradaic pseudocapacitance: metal oxides, nitrides, sulfides, and other advanced inorganic materials, and conducting polymers
• Characterization methods for physical structures and fundamental electrochemical processes of new electrode materials and architectures
• Optimization of components: current collectors, electrodes, electrolytes, separators, and packaging
• Design of new devices and hybrid systems combining capacitors and other power sources (e.g., batteries, fuel cells)
• Capacitor modeling for predicting performances of materials and devices
• New electrolytes for capacitors (redox active electrolytes and ionic liquids)
• Aging and corrosion phenomena in capacitors

Symposium Organizers
Hsi-Sheng Teng (Coodinator), National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan (hteng@mail.ncku.edu.tw)
Chi-Chang Hu (Co-coordinator)
, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (cchu@che.nthu.edu.tw)
Elzbieta Frackowiak (Coordinator)
, Poznan University of Technology, Poznan, Poland
Masashi Ishikawa, Kansai University, Suita, Japan
Frédéric Favier
, CNRS University of Montpellier 2, Montpellier, France



Symposium 6:

New Progress in Electrochemical Solar Cells
Sponsored by: Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

Solar light is the most abundant renewable energy source and has great potential to meet future global energy demands. Solar power generation has been realized in the form of electrochemical cells, such as electrochemical photovoltaic cells, photocatalytic cells, and photoelectrolytic cells, to produce electrical energy or hydrogen. This symposium focuses on the new progresses in the developments of the electrochemical solar cells and includes topics from materials synthesis to devices and the strategies to overcome the current limitations.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Electrochemical photovoltaic cells
• Photoelectrochemical cells
• Water splitting
• Dye sensitized solar cells
• Electrodes
• Electrolytes
• Nanostructured semiconductors and dyes for light harvesting

Symposium Organizers
Ladislav Kavan (Coordinator), J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Prague, Czech Republic (kavan@jh-inst.cas.cz)
Anders Hagfeldt, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
Kuo-Chuan Ho
, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
Jih-Jen Wu
, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan



Symposium 7:

Electrodeposition - The Frontier Approach in Material Science and Nanofabrication
Sponsored by: Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

Electrodeposition is a complex phenomenon which takes place at the solid/liquid interface and represents a unique approach to material synthesis and nanostructure fabrication. In the last decade, electrodeposition has proven to be one of the enabling fabrication methods behind a train of hi-tech enterprises. The most recent developments suggest that electrodeposition will become an attractive fabrication process in many other emerging technologies. The topics of the symposium provide the forum for discussion of the latest developments in electrochemical material science and nanofabrication fields where electrodeposition is used as the main approach.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Alloy electrodeposition
• Advanced electrodeposition protocols for new materials and nanostructures
• Underpotential deposition and electrochemical epitaxy
• Electroless deposition
• Bi-polar electrodeposition
• Additive effect on stress, macrostructure, and properties of electrodeposit
• Electrodeposition of composite coatings and thin films

Symposium Organizers
Stanko Brankovic (Coordinator), University of Houston,
Houston, USA (srbrankovic@uh.edu)
Massimo Innocenti
, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
Nosang Myung, University of California, Riverside, USA
Wei-Ping Dow
, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung City,
Taiwan
Ming-Der Ger, National Defense University, Daxi Township,
Taiwan



Symposium 8:

Corrosion and Passivity
Sponsored by: Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

The goal of this symposium is to address the range of issues pertinent to corrosion and passivity. The breadth of the topic is intended to cover the latest developments, with particular focus on new scientific advances regarding: corrosion, passive films, in-situ corrosion measurements, and corrosion in harsh environments (e.g. nuclear, bio). Topics in closely related areas will also be considered, including environmentally assisted corrosion, corrosion modeling and the advanced characterisation of corrosion.

Symposium Organizers
FNick Birbilis (Coordinator), Monash University, Clayton,
Australia (nick.birbilis@eng.monash.edu.au)
Dirk Engelberg, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
Shinji Fujimoto
, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan
Jing-Chie Lin
, National Central University, Zhongli City, Taiwan
Chao-Sung Lin
, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan



Symposium 9:

Electrocatalytic Materials
Sponsored by: Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

This symposium will focus on the electrocatalytic materials participating in electrochemical reactions, which discuss heterogeneous or homogeneous electrocatalysis involved in electrochemical energy conversion, energy storage and processes. Electrocatalytic reactions for these applications involve oxygen reduction/generation, hydrogen oxidation/ generation, alcohol oxidation, fuel production from CO2, and so on. This symposium focusing on the most recent developments of electrocatalytic nanomaterials, including various aspects of their activity, stability, fabrication and characterization. Solicited papers should outline the characteristics of the electrocatalytic materials in the physical and chemical properties, as well as the corresponding electrochemical reactions. A tentative list of topics to be covered is given below.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Electrocatalysis in fuel cells
• Electrocatalysis in metal-air batteries
• Electrocatalysis in electrolyzers
• Electrocatalysis in water splitting
• Environmental electrolysis
• Electrocatalysis for oxidation of small organic molecular
• Durability and deactivation of electrocatalysis
• Electrocatalyst supports
• Electrocatalytic processes
• Electrocatalytic kinetics
• Electrocatalysis and enzymes of bioelectrochemisty
• Advanced in-situ methods for interfacial phenomena of electrocatalysis
• CO2 reduction

Symposium Organizers
Kotaro Sasaki (Coordinator), Brookhaven National Laboratory,
Upton, USA (ksasaki@bnl.gov)
Andrew Lin, Chang Gung University, Toayuan, Taiwan
Chen-Hao Wang
, National Taiwan University of Science and
Technology, Taipei, Taiwan
Anthony Kucernak, Imperial College London, London, UK



Symposium 10:

Electrochemical Technology: New Challenges for a More Competitive Economy
Sponsored by: Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology

Electrochemical Technology will play an important role in the development of innovative industrial and environmental processes. This symposium will focus on recent innovations in this field and will provide a forum for the discussion of the latest advances. Solicited papers should outline electrochemical processing in environmental, industrial or energy applications.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Progresses in fuel cells technology: looking for enhanced performance and longer lifetime
• Development of fuel cells and other/mixed electrochemical energy storage devices to provide electricity for small and or mobile systems
• Development of new electrode and electrolytic materials for industrial and environmental applications
• Electrochemical treatments for degradation of organic pollutants in wastewater and soil
• Coupling green energies to electrochemical remediation devices
• Bioelectrochemical devices: an interesting technological approach for valorizing organic wastes
• Novel processes for industrial electrosynthesis
• Scale up of electrochemical processes with industrial or environmental interest: from the lab to the market
• Electrochemical processes: place in nowadays and future economy

Symposium Organizers
Juan Manuel Peralta-Hernandez (Coordinator), CIATEC,
Leon Guanajuato, Mexico (jperalta@ciatec.mx)
Shi-Chern Yen (Co-coordinator), National Taiwan University,
Taipei, Taiwan (scyen@ntu.edu.tw)
Manuel Andres Rodrigo, Universidad de Castilla-la-Mancha,
Ciudad Real, Spain
Alex Peng, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu,
Taiwan



Symposium 11:

New Important Frontiers in Molecular Electrochemistry
Sponsored by: Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

The symposium will focus on fundamental research in electrochemical transformations at molecular level in order to “cross the frontiers” and to design new trends in applications. The stress will be given to electron transfer reactions and mechanistic studies of newly synthesized organic, organometallic and coordination compounds as well as molecule-like nanoparticles.
Papers should outline electrochemical investigation of defined individual molecules or (supra)molecular systems with the aim to understand their structure – redox reactivity relationship, to describe reaction mechanisms, to elucidate the principles of their action (in medicine, catalysis, analysis, etc.), and to predict their properties.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Electrochemistry and redox mechanisms of new organic, organometallic and coordination compounds
• Host-guest interactions and supramolecular systems
• Electrochemistry of molecule-like nanoparticles
• Short- and long-range electron-transfer reactions
• Molecular (structural) factors influencing or directing electroactivity
• Generation and identification of intermediates
• Spectroelectrochemistry and other combinations of techniques (with ESR, NMR, MS, etc.)
• New applications and mechanisms of redox catalysis
• Mechanisms of electron-transfer induced reaction
• Electrosynthetic reactions
• Photoelectrochemistry and electrochemically generated chemiluminescence
• Molecules for emerging materials (dyes, pigments, NLO materials, etc.)
• Modification of surfaces via electrochemically induced electron transfer
• Molecular electrochemistry in new medical challenges
• Quantum chemical approach to the interpretation of experimental data

Symposium Organizers
Jirí Ludvik (Coordinator), J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Prague, Czech Republic (jiri.ludvik@jh-inst.cas.cz)
Chun-Hsien Chen (Co-coordinator), National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (chhchen@ntu.edu.tw)
Olivier Buriez, CNRS UMR ENS, Paris, France
Flavio Maran, University of Padova, Padova, Italy
Armando Pombeiro, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon, Portugal



Symposium 12:

Physical Electrochemistry: Spectroscopic, Structural, and Theoretical Investigations of the Electrified Interface
Sponsored by: Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

This symposium focuses on the spectroscopic, structural and theoretical investigations of the electrified interface. Recent improvements in ex-situ and in-situ experiments, in combination with theoretical methods, are providing a detailed microscopic picture of the electrochemical interface. In some cases, this insight is leading to the rational design of functional materials and processes for the electrochemical interface. Solicited papers should outline structural, spectroscopic and/ or theoretical studies of the electrified interface. Subjects of interest include both purely fundamental works and more applied studies, devoted to the improvement of electrochemical devices on the basis of physicochemical insight (e.g. electrocatalysis, battery materials).

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• In-situ spectroscopy of electrochemical processes (e.g. infrared, online inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy, online mass spectroscopy, raman, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy)
• Scanning probe microscopy of electrochemical systems (e.g. scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning electrochemical microscopy, atomic force microscopy)
• Bulk structural characterization of materials used in electrochemical applications (e.g. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy)
• Vacuum-based surface science studies applied to electrochemical systems (e.g. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, ion scattering spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption)
• Theoretical simulations of electrochemical systems (first- principles electronic structure theory, molecular dynamics)
• Rational design of functional materials

Symposium Organizers
Andrea Russell (Coordinator), University of Southampton, Southampton, UK (a.e.russell@soton.ac.uk)
Axel Gross, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany
Ifan Stephens, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark
Jyh-Chiang Jiang, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan
Yuh-Lang Lee, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan



Symposium 13:

Molecular Systems for Energy Conversion
Sponsored by: Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

Generating cost effective and environment benign renewable energy is a major challenge for scientific research and devel- opment. Solar energy, which is abundant and sustainable, has attracted enormous effort in recent years. In particular, recent advances in developing of organic/inorganic sensitiz- ers, charge-collection and electrode materials have opened a new paradigm for new solar energy conversion systems with high efficiency, low cost, easy processing and great stability. The topics of the symposium will focus on recent develop- ment in molecular systems for solar energy conversion devices, which include solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSSC), quantum-dot solar cells (QDSC), extremely thin absorber solar cells (ETASC), perovskite solar cells (PSC) and solar fuel cells.

Topics include but are not limited to:
• Design of various molecules for solar-to-fuels conversion
• Design of various dyes for ss-DSSC: organometallic dyes, metal-free organic dyes, porphyrins and so on
• Development of new light absorbers for QDSC and ETASC
• Development of various types of organic hole-transporting materials (HTM) and electron-transporting materials (ETM)
for QDSC and PSC: from small molecules to polymers
• Fabrication and characterization of nanostructured metal oxide electrodes: TiO2, ZnO, Al2O3, NiO, MoO3 and so on
• Structural design for planar heterojunction PSC: from n-type or p-type single-cell devices to tandem devices
• Long-term stability and scale up of lab cells to industrial/ module scale
• Mechanistic aspects of device performance: experimental techniques and theoretical models for the characterization of charge transport, recombination, collection yield and overall efficiency

Symposium Organizers
Jay Wadhawan (Coordinator), The University of Hull, Hull, UK (j.wadhawan@hull.ac.uk)
Carlos Eduardo Frontana Vazquez, CIDETEQ, Queretaro, Mexico
Nathan Lawrence, Schlumberger Cambridge Research, Cambridge, UK
Bluse Ching-Hsing Chen, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan



Symposium 14:

Modeling, Design and Characterization of Nanostructured, Electroactive and Multifunctional Materials
Sponsored by: Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

This symposium will focus on the use of electrochemical ap- proaches to the investigation of fundamental properties of mo- lecular and supramolecular architectures, composites, nanopar- ticles and organic-inorganic hybrids, on electrosynthesis of functional and advanced materials, electrocatalysis and electro- deposition, and finally corrosion. Among the characterization techniques, emphasis will be given to ex-situ and in-situ spec- troscopy and microscopy, including in situ SERS, spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray absorption, photochemistry, scanning probe microscopy.
Solicited papers should outline the interrelation between mo- lecular structure and electrochemical properties, in the pristine state, aggregates and films, and how the redox properties of molecular species are exploited, at the nano- and mesoscale level, to fabricate multifunctional organized films and materials. A tentative list of topics to be covered is given below.

Topics include but are not limited to:
• The design, the fabrication and characterization of functional materials where molecular/supramolecular components are synergistically integrated with electrodes and solid state nanostructured materials
• The computational approaches to molecules and biomolecules interaction with electrode surfaces
• Functional electrode coatings aimed at developing systems for sensing, electro- and photoelectrocatalysis, corrosion and fouling prevention, and electrochemical syntheses

Symposium Organizers
Francesco Paolucci (Coordinator), University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy (francesco.paolucci@unibo.it)
Pawel J. Kulesza, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
Renato Seeber, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
Chin-Lung Kuo, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
Shirley Meng, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, USA



Symposium 15:

Electrochemical Engineering from a Quantum Description to the Plant Modeling: Experiments and Design across Length Scales
Sponsored by: Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

This symposium focuses on the use of multiscale experimental and/or theoretical approaches - from first principles to the device and up to the plant and/or system level - combining physical electrochemistry and electrochemical engineering in view of designing and optimizing electrochemical processes across length scales.
Solicited papers should outline multiscale modelling and spectroscopic-based diagnostics, as well as the design of materials, components, devices, plants and processes of practical interest in particular for electrochemical processing and energy technologies. A tentative list of topics to be covered is given below.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Advanced experimental techniques for the determination or estimation of physicochemical properties involved in transport phenomena (viscosity, diffusivity, conductivity etc.) relying on electrochemical and/or spectroscopic techniques
• Computational electrochemistry for predictions of the structure-function relationships of materials and components, physicochemical properties and electrode processes
• Comparison and correlation of physicochemical properties obtained at various scales and using different techniques
• Prediction of the electrochemical phenomena at interfaces (e.g. liquid/solid, solid/solid, etc.)
• Progresses in understanding of interfacial phenomena at suspended materials
• Interplaying between electrochemical, mechanical and thermal processes
• Systemlevelmodellingandcontrolofcomplexelectrochemical processes, non-linearities and chaos

Symposium Organizers
Alejandro A. Franco (Coordinator), CNRS-University of Picardie, France (alejandro.franco@u-picardie.fr)
Hung-Lung Chou (Co-coordinator), National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (hlchou@mail.ntust.edu.tw)
François Lapicque CNRS and University of Lorraine, Nancy, France
Jaeyoung Lee Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwanju, Korea



Symposium 16:

Supramolecular Electrochemistry for Analysis, Medicine and Biological Sciences
Sponsored by: Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

This symposium is devoted to electrochemistry of supra- molecular and biomolecular systems including studies of host-guest, donor-acceptor interactions, electrochemically triggered molecular switching and electrochemically induced motion in molecular or biomolecular motors. Electron transport mechanisms in the supramolecular assemblies will be discussed, as well as their stereochemical aspects. The utility of electrochemical methods for the characterization of redox- modulating natural products and newly designed antioxidants or anticancer drugs, as well as nanocarriers for the drug delivery will be among topics of this symposium.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Self assembly
• Inclusion complexes
• Biological and biomimetic membranes
• Molecular recognition
• Chirality
• Drug carriers
• Redox therapy

Symposium Organizers
Marilia Goulart (Coordinator), Federal University of Alagoas, Alagoas, Brazil (mofg@qui.ufal.br)
Stéphane Arbault, University of Bordeaux 1, Pessac, France
Renata Bilewicz, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
Hsien-Chang Chang, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan
Chii-Wann Lin, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan



Symposium 17:

Novel in Situ in Operando Methods
Sponsored by: Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry
Division New Topics Committee

Materials and interfaces employed in advanced electrochemical/ electrocatalytic technologies, including fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors and electrolyzers are recognized to be complex and dynamic on a wide range of lengthscale and timescales. To understand and improve the functioning of such electrodes and electrochemical cells, techniques that are able to monitor processes in-situ or in operando under working conditions are thus hugely valuable. This symposium will gather contributions highlighting recent methodological and topical developments in the field and those predicted to be important in the near future. The emphasis will be on advanced frontier methods, multi technique approaches, and synergies between experimental measurements and modelling.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Investigation of electrochemical phenomena using in operando methods based on advanced spectroscopic and microscopic techniques
• Novel in-situ methods applied to electrocatalytic systems generally, fuel cells, energy storage systems and other complex electrochemical systems, including S/TEM, NMR, mass spectrometry, Raman microscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy and diffraction, XPS and in-situ electrochemical probes, among other techniques
• Studieswhichhighlightmaterialsperformanceandstructural/ morphological changes in operando
• Time-andspatially-resolvedmeasurementsofelectrocatalytic reactions at and near to electrode surfaces
• Applications which emphasise unusual environments and conditions (e.g. supercritical fluids, extreme temperatures and pressures)

Symposium Organizers
Hector Abruna (Coordinator), Cornell University, Ithaca, USA (hda1@cornell.edu) Patrick Unwin, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
Anthony Kucernak, Imperial College London, London, UK
Michael Eikerling, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada
Shawn D. Li, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan
Ming Chang Yang, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan



Symposium 18:

General Session
Sponsored by: All Divisions

This Symposium will cover all ISE areas not compatible with topical symposia.

Symposium Organizers
Justin Gooding (Coordinator), The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia (justin.gooding@unsw.edu.au)
Juan M. Feliu, University of Alicante, Alicante, Spain
Nae-Lih Wu, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
Liang-Yih Chen, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan